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Violin

Fabrizio

Senta

Violin

Made in Turin, Italy

1667

unlabelled

A fine and interesting violin by Fabrizio Senta, Turin, Italy, 1667. Typical brown-gold varnish, with an excellent one-piece back of choice maple.
This violin shows influence of his contemporaries, and certainly the hand of his pupil Giofreddo Cappa.

The ribs and scroll of this violin are not original to the body, and show the hand of great French work, potentially the Vuillaume workshop.

This violin comes with a certificate from Charles Beare.
History & Provenance
Fabrizio Senta embodies all the early characteristics of the Turin school in the second half of the seventeenth century. Superficially Amatise, the work is also very controlled and craftsmanlike, and covered with a ruddy-brown, slightly opaque varnish of good quality. The arching tends to be high and a little narrow, but the 'f' holes well disposed and a little close to the edge. The striking thing about the outline is the long, outward projecting corners, and this provides the strongest clue to Senta's influences and origin. These corners are themselves determined by the long rib corners, which are drawn together and jointed centrally, rather than the neatly overlapping short mitre that is so characteristic of Cremonese work. These extended rib joints are a sure sign of what is often referred to as the 'Saxon' style of making, familiar from the vast numbers of cottage industry instruments made there in the nineteenth century. No mould was used, and the rib garland made 'in the air', on a board, or on the back itself. Some early Turin makers, including Senta himself, are known to have fitted the ribs into a slot cut around the inner edges of the back, a technique observed in old English and Dutch work also.

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Fabrizio

Senta

Made in Turin, Italy

1667

unlabelled

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